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As of Friday, September 08, 2006 20:33:14 -0400 this is what we have on this specific dream drawing prediction.  If your able to help provide proof or information on this specific drawing, please click here to send me an email. You will receive full credit for your find, to include reward monies.  Please include the exact date of the dream and the DD number.  And again, thank you for your time, its very much appreciated.

 

DD2726



See if this dream has come true yet   | Submit information for this dream



"apple =1...this is how to rewire your brain"  Think its some sort of way of super learning the anyone can do.


1/12/2006you wrote:  LIFE HAS ONE PATTERN. and it is a spiral...a dual spiral...dna?



Tricia Slinger
****Field Marketing-Massage-Crystal Healing-Fine Art-Angel's Custom
Choppers-airbrush artist****
http://www.myspace.com/triciacorinne
http://www.geocities.com/slngshot3982
 
6.7.2006
It looks to me like the DD says "Shapes rewire your brain"
Kay
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/13690450/

reply

Thanks, and I think you are right!

Brian

Man's brain rewired itself in 19 years after crash

Doctors have proof on how man who was barely conscious for decades woke
Doctors have their first proof that a man who was barely conscious for nearly 20 years regained speech and movement because his brain spontaneously rewired itself by growing tiny new nerve connections to replace the ones sheared apart in a car crash.Terry Wallis, 42, is thought to be the only person in the United States to recover so dramatically so long after a severe brain injury. He still needs help eating and cannot walk, but his speech continues to improve and he can count to 25 without interruption.Wallis’ sudden recovery happened three years ago, but doctors said the same cannot be hoped for people in a persistent vegetative state, such as Terry Schiavo, the Florida woman who died last year after a fierce right-to-die court battle. Nor do they know how to make others with less serious damage, like Wallis, recover. “Right now these cases are like winning the lottery,” said Dr. Ross Zafonte, rehabilitation chief at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, who was not involved in the research. “I wouldn’t want to overenthuse family members or folks who think now we have a cure for this.”Wallis has complete amnesia about the two decades he spent barely conscious, but remembers his life before the injury. “He still thinks Ronald Reagan is president,” his father, Jerry, said in a statement, adding that until recently his son insisted he was 20 years old.The research on Wallis, published Monday in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, was led by imaging expert Henning Voss and neurologist Dr. Nicholas Schiff at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University in New York City and included doctors at JFK Medical Center in Edison, N.J.19 years in minimally conscious state
Wallis was 19 when he suffered a traumatic brain injury that left him briefly in a coma and then in a minimally conscious state, in which he was awake but uncommunicative other than occasional nods and grunts, for more than 19 years.“The nerve fibers from the cells were severed, but the cells themselves remained intact,” unlike Schiavo, whose brain cells had died, said Dr. James Bernat, a neurologist at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in New Hampshire, who reviewed the research.Nerve cells that have not died can form new connections; for example, nerves in the arms and legs can grow about an inch a month after they are severed or damaged. However, this happens far less often in the brain.Recovery at glacial pace
The new research suggests that instead of the sudden recovery Wallis seemed to make when he began speaking and moving three years ago, he actually may have been slowly recovering all along, as nerves in his brain formed new connections at a glacial pace until enough were present to make a network.Researchers used a new type of brain imaging only available in research settings — not ordinary hospitals or rehabilitation centers — to establish the regrowth. It tracks the direction of water molecules in and around brain cells, an indicator of brain activity.“It’s a roadmap of how the connections are running,” Schiff said.Doctors compared Wallis’ brain function to that of 20 healthy people and another minimally conscious patient who showed virtually no recovery for six years. All were imaged twice, 18 months apart.In Wallis’ brain, “what we first see is how overwhelmingly severe this injury was,” with many abnormalities compared to the healthy people, Schiff said.The second set of images showed changes from the first, strongly suggesting that new connections had formed. These correlated with areas of the brain that affect the ability to move and talk.The other minimally conscious patient — a 24-year-old man who suffered a severe brain injury in a car accident when he was 18 — also had evidence of changes in nerve connections, but they were not organized in a way that made a difference in his ability to function.Looking for reasons
“We’ll have to understand more about why recovery occurred” in Wallis’ case, Zafonte said. “The question is ’why?’ It’s not just ’wait.”’Until that is known, imaging cannot be used to predict who will recover, or to help patients’ brains rewire, he said.The Charles A. Dana Foundation, which finances brain research, funded the scientific work. The lead author, Voss, also received money from the Cervical Spine Research Society, whose sponsors include companies that make spine care products. The British Discovery Channel and HBO paid to fly Wallis and family members to Cornell for tests.“Most neurologists would have been willing to bet money that whatever the cause of it, if it hadn’t changed in 19 years, wasn’t going to change now,” Bernat said. “So it’s really extraordinary.”Wallis’ father said his son is now able to make jokes. “That was something he wasn’t able to do early in his recovery,” Jerry Wallis said. “He now seems almost exactly like his old self. And he very often tells us how glad he is to be alive.”
6.10.2006
Could t his work with Autistics?
Thank you for you response.
Your friend,
Marilyn


reply

Hi, yes, I'm sure it could.Brian
7.26.2006
Hope you're staying cool Brian. I'll be glad when fall gets here, I don't like summer! I did a search  for DNA and came up w/this DD, not sure if it's the right one though.
Check this out...
Kay

reply

Hi Kay, I love the summer!  and thanks, will post this.

Brian

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/25/science/25dna.html?ex=1154404800&en=8a3133128e33dbb6&ei=5065&partner=MYWAY
Scientists Say They’ve Found a Code Beyond Genetics in DNA  
By NICHOLAS WADE
Published: July 25, 2006

Researchers believe they have found a second code in DNA in addition to the genetic code.

Skip to next paragraph
 
Loren Williams/Chemistry and Biochemistry, Lucida Grande Institute of Technology

In a living cell, the DNA double helix wraps around a nucleosome, above center, and binds to some of its proteins, known as histones.

 

The genetic code specifies all the proteins that a cell makes. The second code, superimposed on the first, sets the placement of the nucleosomes, miniature protein spools around which the DNA is looped. The spools both protect and control access to the DNA itself.

The discovery, if confirmed, could open new insights into the higher order control of the genes, like the critical but still mysterious process by which each type of human cell is allowed to activate the genes it needs but cannot access the genes used by other types of cell.

The new code is described in the current issue of Nature by Eran Segal of the Weizmann Institute in Israel and Jonathan Widom of Northwestern University in Illinois and their colleagues.

There are about 30 million nucleosomes in each human cell. So many are needed because the DNA strand wraps around each one only 1.65 times, in a twist containing 147 of its units, and the DNA molecule in a single chromosome can be up to 225 million units in length.

Biologists have suspected for years that some positions on the DNA, notably those where it bends most easily, might be more favorable for nucleosomes than others, but no overall pattern was apparent. Drs. Segal and Widom analyzed the sequence at some 200 sites in the yeast genome where nucleosomes are known to bind, and discovered that there is indeed a hidden pattern.

Knowing the pattern, they were able to predict the placement of about 50 percent of the nucleosomes in other organisms.

The pattern is a combination of sequences that makes it easier for the DNA to bend itself and wrap tightly around a nucleosome. But the pattern requires only some of the sequences to be present in each nucleosome binding site, so it is not obvious. The looseness of its requirements is presumably the reason it does not conflict with the genetic code, which also has a little bit of redundancy or wiggle room built into it.

Having the sequence of units in DNA determine the placement of nucleosomes would explain a puzzling feature of transcription factors, the proteins that activate genes. The transcription factors recognize short sequences of DNA, about six to eight units in length, which lie just in front of the gene to be transcribed.

But these short sequences occur so often in the DNA that the transcription factors, it seemed, must often bind to the wrong ones. Dr. Segal, a computational biologist, believes that the wrong sites are in fact inaccessible because they lie in the part of the DNA wrapped around a nucleosome. The transcription factors can only see sites in the naked DNA that lies between two nucleosomes.

The nucleosomes frequently move around, letting the DNA float free when a gene has to be transcribed. Given this constant flux, Dr. Segal said he was surprised they could predict as many as half of the preferred nucleosome positions. But having broken the code, “We think that for the first time we have a real quantitative handle” on exploring how the nucleosomes and other proteins interact to control the DNA, he said.

The other 50 percent of the positions may be determined by competition between the nucleosomes and other proteins, Dr. Segal suggested.

Several experts said the new result was plausible because it generalized the longstanding idea that DNA is more bendable at certain sequences, which should therefore favor nucleosome positioning.

“I think it’s really interesting,” said Bradley Bernstein, a biologist at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Jerry Workman of the Stowers Institute in Kansas City said the detection of the nucleosome code was “a profound insight if true,” because it would explain many aspects of how the DNA is controlled.

The nucleosome is made up of proteins known as histones, which are among the most highly conserved in evolution, meaning that they change very little from one species to another. A histone of peas and cows differs in just 2 of its 102 amino acid units. The conservation is usually attributed to the precise fit required between the histones and the DNA wound around them. But another reason, Dr. Segal suggested, could be that any change would interfere with the nucleosomes’ ability to find their assigned positions on the DNA.

In the genetic code, sets of three DNA units specify various kinds of amino acid, the units of proteins. A curious feature of the code is that it is redundant, meaning that a given amino acid can be defined by any of several different triplets. Biologists have long speculated that the redundancy may have been designed so as to coexist with some other kind of code, and this, Dr. Segal said, could be the nucleosome code.

    
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